Previous Action: California Environmental Policy Council

The California Environmental Policy Council (CEPC) was originally established by the Environmental Protection Permit Reform Act of 1993 to designate a consolidated permit agency for applicants for environmental permits from multiple environmental agencies. This page contains previous action items.

Previous Actions

1. Multimedia Evaluation of Viscon-Treated Diesel Fuel (2011)

A public hearing to consider a multimedia evaluation of Viscon-Treated Diesel Fuel is scheduled for August 15, 2011 at 1:00 PM in Sacramento, CA.

In 2003 Viscon California, LLC applied for verification of its proprietary fuel additive, Viscon®, in accordance with the Air Resources Board Diesel Emission Control Strategy Verification Procedure (Verification Procedure) pursuant to title 13, California Code of Regulations, sections 2700 to 2710. According to the Verification Procedure, a diesel emission control strategy may not be verified unless a multimedia evaluation of the fuel has been conducted, pursuant to the California Health and Safety Code section 43830.8, and the California Environmental Policy Council (CEPC) has determined that there will not be a significant adverse impact on public health or the environment in comparison to diesel fuel meeting ARB motor vehicle diesel fuel specifications.

2. Green Chemistry: Safer Consumer Product Alternatives (2010)  

Assembly Bill 1879 (Chapter 559, Statutes of 2008), established regulatory authority for DTSC to adopt regulations for identifying and prioritizing chemicals of concern in consumer products and for evaluating safer alternatives to toxic chemicals through a science-based approach. AB 1879 (HSC § 25252 and 25253) required DTSC to adopt regulations no later than January 1, 2011. Additionally, the law (HSC § 25252.5) required DTSC to prepare, and submit to the CEPC for review, a multimedia evaluation prior to adopting these regulations. However, the law provided an exception to this process. Specifically, DTSC was allowed to adopt the regulations without being subject to a multimedia evaluation if the CEPC conclusively determined that the regulations will not have any significant adverse impact on public health or the environment. The DTSC prepared a report on the need for a multimedia evaluation of the Safer Consumer Product Alternatives regulations and determined that the regulations would not result in any significant adverse environmental impacts. On October 27, 2010, a CEPC public hearing was held and the CEPC determined that the Safer Consumer Product Alternatives regulations will not have any significant adverse impact on public health or the environment

3. Environmental Fate and Transport and Potential Health Effects of Using PuriNoX In California Diesel (2004)  

In 2004 Lubrizol Corporation (Lubrizol) submitted an application for PuriNOX as an emission control strategy pursuant to the Diesel Emission Control Strategy Verification Procedure. Lubrizol developed PuriNOx as a water-emulsified diesel fuel that is designed to reduce emissions such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen from diesel fueled engines.  As a requirement for verification, PuriNOx underwent a multi-media assessment to determine if the use of PuriNOx results in a significant adverse impact on public health or the environment in comparison to diesel fuel that already met the ARB motor vehicle diesel fuel specifications. An interagency multi-media working group conducted a multimedia evaluation of the production, use, and disposal of PuriNOx. An CEPC public hearing was held on April 30, 2004 in which the CEPC determined that there will not be a significant adverse impact on public health or the environment that is likely to result from the limited use of PuriNOx in California diesel fuel.

4. Multimedia Evaluation of Amendments to the California Diesel Fuel Regulations (2004)  

On July 24, 2003 the ARB approved regulations establishing California motor vehicle diesel  fuel specifications.  The regulations reduced the maximum sulfur content of vehicular diesel, established standards for vehicular diesel fuel lubricity, set new specifications for aromatic hydrocarbon limits, and made other changes.  The ARB determined that the distribution, use and dispersal of the diesel fuel expected to be produced in compliance with the diesel fuel regulation amendments would not result in any significant adverse environmental impacts.  On April 30, 2004 a CEPC public hearing was held and the CEPC determined that the regulatory actions of the ARB will not have any significant adverse impact on public health or the environment.

5. The Environmental Fate and Transport and Potential Health Effects of Using Ethanol in California's Reformulated Gasoline (1999)  

On March 25, 1999, Governor Davis issued an Executive Order calling for the removal of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline no later than December 31, 2002. The ARB was directed  to adopt California Phase 3 Reformulated Gasoline regulations (RFG) that maintain or improve upon emissions and air quality benefits achieved by California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline in California. On December 9, 1999, the ARB approved the California RFG regulations  that  included a prohibition of the use of MTBE in gasoline by December 31, 2002. With the phase-out of MTBE, ethanol was the likely substitute oxygenate that refiners would choose to meet this requirement. The ARB, SWRCB, and OEHHA conducted a multimedia environmental assessment on the use of ethanol in gasoline. On January 18, 2000 an CEPC public hearing was held and  the CEPC determined that there will not be a significant adverse environmental impact on public or the environment that is likely to result from the use of ethanol in gasoline.

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Last updated: February 15, 2013
California Environmental Protection Agency, http://www.calepa.ca.gov
General Public Contact, cepacomm@calepa.ca.gov (916) 323-2514